Senators Question Mandatory Health Insurance Constitutionality

Senators Question Mandatory Health Insurance Constitutionality

Scott P. Brown’s win yesterday may be a harbinger of things to come for Obama’s health care reform plan; the idea of universal health insurance first touted in Obama’s platform for change seems to be on the verge of severe change itself. One question Republicans will likely concentrate on at present is whether mandatory private insurance violates the constitution or not.

The shock of a Republican winner in Massachusetts, a traditionally very, blue, very Democratic state is just beginning to be felt. One thing, however, is sure – voters are angry. The Obama administration’s focus on passing health care reform to make affordable health insurance more accessible to masses seems to have caused ire in his constituency. With the effects of the recession still on everyone’s mind, the concentration on health care has hampered Obama’s plans. Now Republicans have the power to impede those exact plans.

Republicans have plenty to discuss. Many Republicans have seen the health care plan from the get-go as a travesty to local governments. It would put a tax burden on small businesses, the rich, as well as unions. The cost of these new taxes may be more of a hindrance than a blessing. Furthermore, Republicans fear it would put Big Brother at the helm.

The big question remains: is mandatory private health insurance constitutional? Democrats cite the case of Social Security, which was approved by the Supreme Court in 1937 as a tax